Overview

Ferrari may be famous for their supercars, but the company is also adept at making powerful and luxurious grand touring cars. Their expertise in the segment is exemplified by the 2020 GTC4Lusso and GTC4Lusso T. The GTC4Lusso offers a monstrously powerful V-12 and all-wheel drive, while the GTC4Lusso T has a smaller but still powerful turbocharged V-8 and rear-wheel drive. Both are otherwise near-identical 2+2 coupes, meaning they have room for four, but only two doors, making this the only family-oriented Ferrari in the Italian automaker’s line up—for now. The addition of the two extra seats don’t detract from the GTC4Lusso’s performance, as the Lusso V-12’s 208-mph top speed confirms. But this Ferrari is also as civilized and comfortable as it is fast and ferocious.

What’s New for 2020?

There are no meaningful changes for 2020 in either the GTC4Lusso or GTC4Lusso T.

Pricing and Which One to Buy

  • GTC4Lusso T: $263,750
  • GTC4Lusso: $303,750

    Even though it means we’re missing out on the throaty 6.3-liter V-12 engine, we’d pick the cheaper and slightly less powerful GTC4Lusso T over the $40,000 more expensive GT4CLusso. Both cars are great to drive, like all Ferraris, and the company claims the T is virtually as quick to 60 mph. The twin-turbocharged V-8 is down 78 horsepower to the V-12, but has more torque available at lower engine speeds. While the engines and drivetrains differ between the two, both have the same features and options and are equally well equipped and comfortable. The Lusso T also gets much better fuel economy, with an EPA combined rating of 17 mpg to the Lusso’s 13 mpg combined rating. This means you’ll spend less time at the pump and more time in the driver’s seat of a great grand tourer.

    Engine, Transmission, and Performance

    The main difference between the GTC4Lusso and GTC4Lusso T is their powertrains. The Lusso is powered by a naturally aspirated 6.3-liter V-12, while the Lusso T is powered by a twin-turbocharged 3.9-liter V-8. Both engines are mated to dual-clutch seven-speed automatic transmissions that executes crisp, quick shifts. But the Lusso’s engine drives all four wheels while the Lusso T is rear-wheel drive only. Both models are exceptional performers. Ferrari claims that their zero-to-60-mph times to be in the mid-3.0-second range and says the Lusso will top out at 208 mph while the T gets to 199. In either car, triple-digit speeds will easily appear in your instrument cluster if you don’t exercise caution. Handling is spectacular too, thanks to sensitive, precise steering, which is aided by the standard four-wheel steering system. The GTC4s’ suspensions are tuned for more grand touring comfort than for setting hot laps at the track, but you could certainly do that too; these are Ferraris after all.

    Fuel Economy and Real-World MPG

    The GTC4Lusso and GTC4Lusso T aren’t the most economical cars out there, of course, but compared to their Ferrari stablemates, they are more fuel efficient. The GTC4Lusso’s V-12 is thirsty, with the EPA estimating a return of 12 mpg in city driving and 17 mpg on the highway. The GTC4Lusso T does better, with EPA estimates of 15 mpg city and 21 mpg highway. Chalk up the fuel economy disparity to the difference in driven wheels, engine type, and weight. For comparison, the Aston Martin DBS Superleggera, which has a V-12 engine, puts up similar fuel economy numbers as the V-8 powered GTC4Lusso T. We haven’t had a chance to put the Lusso or Lusso T though our 200-mile highway loop to test real-world fuel economy, but when we do we’ll update this story with results. Then again, does any supercar owner worry about fuel economy?

    Interior, Comfort, and Cargo

    As expected with a Ferrari, the interior is a splendid place to be, with a sea of soft leather surrounding the car’s occupants. There is a large and responsive infotainment display right at your fingertips that spans 10.3 inches. You can comfortably fit four people in this grand tourer’s cabin, as long as none of them are above average height. Ferrari offers a wide range of interior options including leather color, trim materials, and seat types, allowing customers to spec-out their GTC4Lusso exactly to their liking. Unlike other competitors in the segment, like the McLaren GT and DBS Superleggera, the GTC4Lusso has plenty of cargo space thanks to its hatchback design. In our testing, we were able to fit four carry-ons behind the rear seats, which also fold flat if you happen to need more space.

    Infotainment and Connectivity

    The GTC4Lusso’s infotainment system is one of the better ones in this segment: it’s a highly responsive, 10.3-inch touchscreen system with capacitive-touch controls. It’s accompanied by a dedicated knob-and-button interface as well, offering two methods of manipulating the screen. Like many other Ferraris, this one also offers the option for a passenger display that supplants the infotainment system.

    Safety and Driver Assistance Features

    Neither the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) nor the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) have performed crash tests on the GTC4Lusso, and such tests are not likely to happen. Besides a standard backup camera and airbags, this six-figure sports car doesn’t offer any major safety features. Then again, if safety features are the most important part of buying a car, you’re looking in the wrong segment – here safety takes a back seat to speed.

    Warranty and Maintenance Coverage

    Ferrari offers a comprehensive warranty and maintenance program, as one would come to expect from a high-end supercar maker. The company’s limited and powertrain warranties match the coverage of its chief rival, Lamborghini. Ferrari, however, one ups Lamborghini with seven years of complimentary maintenance, a service most automakers don’t offer.

    • Limited warranty covers 3 years or unlimited miles
    • Powertrain warranty covers 3 years or unlimited miles
    • Complimentary scheduled maintenance covers 7 years or unlimited miles

      Specifications

      More Features and Specs



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